The coming food shortage crisis is serious, as well as the CNA, a federally funded research and development center, considers food creation will forever fall short of eating, although that might be stretching it a bit.

With much more people going to reside in cities and urbanization of life, there will additionally be a workforce shortage on farms.

This really isn’t the very first time we people are coping with famine and food shortage. We’ve been fighting it our whole history. In previous ages, innovations like mechanized farming and fertilizers helped us find methods to tap into more resources and make more food to deal with our needs.

Now, however, resources have become more rare, and we want breakthroughs that can help make more efficient use of whatever we have at hand.

Conventional agriculture is founded on performing specific jobs, including reaping and planting, predicated on a predetermined program. Under this particular version, there’s minimal control over waste and damage.

Nevertheless, recent technical improvements have gone a ways toward making “precision farming” potential, which calls for collecting real time information and getting actionable insights that could define what precisely must be done at each place at just about any specified time.

“Precision Agriculture can transform the food industry to be less expensive, more efficient, and sustainable says International Supply Chain Specialist at IBM, Paul Chang. “By using various detector information to be gathered by IoT systems and incorporate with predictive analytics, the business can take actions to optimize output, minimize losses, and ensure sustainable practices.”

“Digital progress in technology may help stabilize harvests and have the ability to make agriculture more productive,” says Kai Goerlich, Digital Futures Research Director at SAP. “Detectors and real time analytics may be utilized to optimize the planting, growing, harvesting, and carrying of food commodities.”

“Vital information from across whole farms are gathered and assessed by just one cloud stage, making farming sustainable and more efficient,” Goerlich says.

“Now’s local and substantial farms can leverage IoT to remotely track detectors that detect livestock feed degrees and soil moisture, crop growing, remotely control and manage their irrigation equipment, and combine functional information with third Party tips,” says Will Yapp, Vice President of Business Development at Senet, a manufacturer of IoT sensors.

This really is not the first time we individuals are coping with famine and food shortage.

The mixture, Yapp says, offers new ways to make use of empirical data to enhance operational planning and decision making.

Senet’s sensors operate over Low Power, Wide Area Networks (LPWAN) to decrease the costs of deployment and connectivity over long ranges. “[LPWAN detectors] are perfect for collecting data about local agricultural and environmental states supporting IoT programs designed to raise the sustainability, amount, quality and cost effectiveness of agricultural production,” Yapp says.

The data created with these sensors could be utilized to enhance precision farming, like employing water to places where the wetness of earth has fell instead of wasting water in regions that don’t need it, Yapp describes. “A IoT-managed watering system can drastically decrease consumption while at the same time increasing outputs,” he says.

IBM’s Chang also presents scenarios where emerging technologies can help unlock the power of precision farming, including the mix of video-capturing drones and cloud-based analytics applications that may show the current states of crops and assist farmers in taking activities that may impact the growth curve of the harvests.

Leveraging weather forecast data

Being able to incorporate weather forecasts into the farming process is also an important component of precision farming. “Just tracking incoming weather condition can help ensure that water is just used when required,” Chang says.

“Ninety percent of all crop losses are due to weather,” adds Carrie Gillespie, Agriculture Lead for The Weather Company, an IBM company. This really is particularly important as climate change farming across the planet in distinct areas and is starting to take its toll on crops.

Having the ability to incorporate weather forecasts into the farming process is also an essential component of precision farming.

The right use of soil and weather data can give insights into when and how much to irrigate, or how to boost crop yield while reducing the use of pesticide and fertilizer, Gillespie describes.

The use of analytics and machine learning technology may also enable disease and pest prediction and help growers prevent the loss of harvests and tune their use of substances.

This practice is being used by Seven Springs Farm in Cadiz, Kentucky, which uses cloud -established software systems hosted by tractor manufacturer John Deere to enhance its corn crop yield. “The farm uses a program to calibrate fertilizer purchases according to weather predictions, reducing runoff,” says SAP’s Goerlich, whose company is involved in the initiative. “We have also seen an increase of agricultural institutes implement apps to help with weather forecasts that in return create a greater number of crops which are not dangerous to have.”

“The ‘art of farming ’ ought to be augmented with the ‘science of farming’ where the farmers can use data and predictive analytics to make the very best choices,” Chang says. “ These technologies can now be readily used up by people so that everyone in the entire world, including those in the developing countries, can have access to the most recent technologies accessible to others, by leveraging mobile apparatus.”

Integrating weather forecasts into the agriculture process also helps enhance the logistics around harvesting and transportation. Land and weather analytics set and can call which fields workers ought to be deployed to and when areas will be least influenced by the weight of picking gear. It can also help call which distribution courses will undoubtedly be influenced by upcoming and rain weather changes, especially in nations where roads are dirt and heavy rain can cause trucks to get stuck in mud.

 

Product recalls also contribute to damage and waste — and they happen a lot. As studies suggest, in many cases, up to 50 percent of recalled food items are not contaminated, which ramps up costs and causes a lot of good food to go to waste. The reason is that there isn’t enough visibility into the supply chain. Federal regulations mandate that firms have traceability one step up and down the supply chain, but this isn’t sufficient for food items and perishable products, which move very quickly across the chain.

“In a recall, understanding the origin of the contamination and its reach is critical in helping to prevent untainted product from being wasted and discarded unnecessarily,” says Dean Wiltse, CEO at FoodLogiQ, a software company that helps promote food safety through traceability and sustainability.

Resources are becoming more scarce, and we need breakthroughs that will help make more efficient use of whatever we already have at hand.

FoodLogiQ aims to provide increased visibility across the supply chain by capturing and storing data at each step of the journey, and providing customers with an interface that enables them to scan products and gain immediate access to their supply chain history, as opposed to the traditional manual processes and spreadsheets involved with supply chain management.

“End-to-end traceability minimizes food waste in product recalls by helping companies realize efficiency and uncover visibility across their supply chain,” Wiltse says. “End-to-end traceability can help identify the source of the outbreak, trace back each step in the supply chain — all the way to the exact farm, batch, and container.”

The streamlined supply chain management will help avoid discarding uncontaminated food, Wiltse believes, and also prevent delays that can impact food quality.

On-demand food printing

In the near future, we might be producing our food in a totally different way, suggests Jordan French, CMO at 3D food printing startup BeeHex. “3D printing technology constitutes the perfect opportunity to eliminate inefficiencies across the food market by dramatically reducing food spoilage during the supply chain while bolstering the consumer’s ability to personalize according to her wants and needs,” he says.

Product recalls also contribute to waste and damage — and they occur a lot. In many instances, up to 50 percent of recalled food things aren’t contaminated, which ramps up prices and causes a lot of great food to go to waste as studies indicate. National regulations mandate that businesses have traceability one measure up and down the supply chain, but this isn’t satisfactory for perishable merchandises and food items, which go very quickly through the chain.

In a recall, understanding the source of its particular reach and the contamination is crucial in assisting to prevent merchandise that is untainted from discarded and being wasted unnecessarily,” says a software company which helps promote food safety through traceability and sustainability, Dean Wiltse, CEO at FoodLogiQ.

Resources are becoming more rare, and we want breakthroughs which will help make more efficient use of whatever we already have at hand.

FoodLogiQ aims to provide increased visibility on the other side of the supply chain by capturing and saving data at every step of the journey, and providing customers with an interface that allows them to scan products and get immediate access to their supply chain history, as opposed to the traditional manual processes and spreadsheets involved with supply chain management.

“End to end traceability can help identify the source of the outbreak, trace back each step in the supply chain — all the approach to batch the precise farm, and container.”

The streamlined supply chain management will help avert losing uncontaminated food, Wiltse also prevent delays that could impact food quality, and believes.

In a completely different way, we might be producing our food in the near future, suggests Jordan French, CMO at 3D food print startup BeeHex. “ 3D printing technology represents an ideal opportunity to eliminate inefficiencies across the food market by drastically reducing food spoilage during the supply chain while reinforcing the consumer’s skill to personalize according to her wants and needs,” he says.

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